Portage Wisconsin

The Budweiser Clydesdales Visit The Great Wolf Lodge

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Budweiser Clydesdales

Budweiser Clydesdales
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Budweiser Clydesdales

Budweiser Clydesdales
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Budweiser Clydesdales

Clydesdales

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From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clydesdales

"The Clydesdale is a breed of draft horse derived from the very hard-working farm horses of Clydesdale, Scotland, and named for that region. Thought to be over 300 years old, the breed was extensively used for pulling heavy loads in rural, industrial and urban settings, their common use extending into the 1960s when they were a still a familiar sight pulling the carts of milk and vegetable vendors.

They have been exported in the Commonwealth and United States where they are famous for their use as the mascot of various beer brands, including company Anheuser-Busch's Budweiser brand, Carlton & United Beverages and several others.

At one time there were at least 140,000 Clydesdales known in Scotland; by 1949 just 80 animals were licensed in England and by 1975 the Rare Breed Survival Trust had listed the breed as "vulnerable". Clydesdales have since seen resurgence in popularity and population, resulting in the breed's status being reclassified favorably as "at risk" with an estimated global population of just 5,000 individuals. Clydesdales are now most numerous in the United States where recently over 600 foals are reportedly born each year.

Today, the Clydesdale's most significant presence is in exhibition and parade.

Clydesdales are noted for grace and versatility; they can stand as tall as 20 hands (the current world-record holding Clydesdale) in height and can weigh upwards of one ton (2,000 pounds). A Clydesdale has a large head and can have somewhat convex profile(a Roman-nose) small ears, large, dark eyes and a heavy forelock. The neck is short and slightly arched, the chest deep, the shoulders well-muscled and slightly upright to accommodate the animated hitching gait. The Clydesdale tends to exhibit a longer coupling than its cousin, the Shire and the withers are clearly defined. The rump presents a well-muscled and distinctively rounded silhouette. The legs should be long and strong with characteristically large hoof size, typically being at least twice the diameter of those of a light riding horse, such as a Thoroughbred. The pasterns are longer and sloping than those of a stock-type horse. Perhaps the most widely recognised feature of the Clydesdale's appearance is the abundance of feather, the long hairs that fall from below just the knees and hocks to cover the hooves.

The characteristic action of a Clydesdale is demonstrated at a trot; an animated gait with high hoof action in both the front and rear. Despite its large size, the Clydesdale presents with an energetic quality described by the Clydesdale Horse Society as "gaiety of carriage and outlook."